addiction and recovery counseling

Individual Counseling

Individual counseling (sometimes called “psychotherapy” or “therapy”) is a process through which clients work one-on-one with a trained counselor—in a safe, caring, and confidential environment—to explore their feelings, beliefs, or behaviors, work through challenges of addiction, recovery or other trauma. Individual counseling allows clients to identify aspects of their lives that they would like to change, a chance to better understand themselves, set personal goals, and work toward desired change.

 

Group Counseling

SMART Recovery is the leading self-empowering addiction recovery support group. Our participants learn tools for addiction recovery based on the latest scientific research and participate in a world-wide community which includes free, self-empowering, science-based mutual help groups. The SMART Recovery 4-Point Program helps people recover from all types of addiction and addictive behaviors, including: drug abuse, drug addiction, substance abuse, alcohol abuse, gambling addiction, cocaine addiction, prescription drug abuse, sexual addiction, and problem addiction to other substances and activities.

Family Groups

Constructive and active family engagement in the recovery process is essential if the family is to heal from the destructive impact of addiction.  To move on, families need a variety of supports, information and skills.  Families need a place where they can feel safe to process the complicated and complex emotions that arise in the face of addiction and recovery.  

The first few sessions of a process group, also known as personal exploration groups, usually focus on the establishment of trust. During this time, the group therapists and group members work towards establishing a level of trust that allows them to communicate openly and honestly. In a climate of trust, people feel free to care about and help each other. New members are often amazed at how much their contributions help other members.  Group trust is enhanced when all members make a commitment to the group. 

During the group meeting time, members are responsible for talking about what is troubling them.  Discussion flows according to what members would like to talk about -- the group leaders do not, for the most part, assign topics for the group to discuss.  Members are encouraged to give support and feedback to others, and to work with the reactions and responses that other members' contributions bring up for them.  Group members and group therapists may serve as models for effective communication, offer problem-solving strategies, and promote self-acceptance and self-support.

Unexpressed feelings are a major reason why people experience difficulties and distress. Sharing your thoughts and feelings in a safe and supportive environment is an important part of group therapy and strongly affects how much you will be helped. The climate of trust provided by the group promotes an environment where members feel safe to share their struggles and work collaboratively to understand one another. As individuals increase their self-awareness, develop new ways of relating to people, and learn new adaptive behaviors, they make progress towards their personal goals that brought them to the group.